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Probiotic Feature with Neogen

What Is Probiotic Skin Care & Is It Worth The Hype?

In case you missed it, probiotic skin care is having a serious moment right now. And it’s easy to see why — if probiotics are great for your gut, we can only assume that probiotic skin care is great for your skin, right? We answer this question and many, many more below.

What Are Probiotics?
Generally speaking, probiotics are believed to restore the natural balance of bacteria in your gut. As Dr. Ross Perry, Medical Director of Cosmedics Skin Clinic in London, tells The Klog, while you may think of probiotics as “the live beneficial bacteria that are naturally created by the process of fermentation in foods like yogurt, supplements, health drinks, sauerkraut, miso soup, [and] kimchi,” today, they are also synonymous with skin care.
How Do Probiotics Work In Skin Care?
According to NYC-based board-certified dermatologist Dr. Hadley King, “over a thousand species of bacteria live on the surface of our skin which are essential to help fight infection, protect against environmental damaging factors, regulate PH levels and keep the skin healthy.” However, many of the skin care products we tend to use have been known to work against this, throwing off our skin’s natural balance and leading to problems like acne, rosacea, and general dryness. But that’s where probiotic skin care comes in.
Just as probiotics work to restore the natural balance of bacteria in your gut, probiotic skin care is believed to restore the natural balance of bacteria on your skin. Using probiotics topically can “help regulate the skin’s natural immune (or inflammatory) response,” says Dr. King. This means “that equilibrium is maintained and [the] skin becomes less reactive.”
What Benefits Can I Expect?
It is important to note that more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of probiotic skin care. However, according to Dr. Perry, early studies indicate that it can help alleviate acne, eczema, rosacea, and dry flaky skin and even reduce the appearance of scars, bumps, and uneven patches. 
Better still, “the use of topical probiotics is thought to help build collagen and reduce our inflammatory response, which makes the skin more resistant to negative effects of exposure to [the] sun.” It can also improve and strengthen the skin barrier. You know that means? With the help of probiotic skin care, you can say goodbye to wrinkles and fine lines and hello to hydration!
What Products Contain Probiotics?
When it comes to integrating probiotic skin care into your regime, look no further than the On the Bright Moisturizer from Good Skin Days™, developed by Soko Glam Labs™. Formulated with probiotics and fermented ingredients, this lightweight moisturizer not only hydrates your skin but also works to balance your skin microbiome and strengthen the skin barrier. 
Another favorite is the Probiotics Double Action Serum by NEOGEN, a dual serum made up of The Probiotic Serum and The Pro Barrier Action Serum. Working to restore the skin’s pH levels for a hydrated, healthy appearance, the Probiotic Serum is formulated with skin-friendly ferments in the form of probiotics and prebiotics to create an optimal acidic environment for the skin.
The Bottom Line
So, is probiotic skin care worth the hype? Ultimately, there’s no harm in adding gentle and science-backed probiotic skin care products to your routine. While more research is needed, “There is undeniable evidence to suggest that skin probiotics work in a similar way as they do for the digestive system and help to protect us against environmental damage responsible for premature aging, inflammation of the skin, and acne flare-ups.”
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Have you ever used probiotics in your skin care? Share your experiences or questions below!
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